wonderland-to-westeros:

It is not precisely known when Elizabeth Siddal bridged the gap from muse to artist, nor is it known whether the desire to be an artist emerged during her time as a model or was a long-harboured dream brought to life by newfound circumstances. Whatever the case, we know that by 1853 Dante Gabriel Rossetti was teaching Lizzie to be an artist.
In 1854, John Ruskin- icon and patron of artists, including Pre-Raphaelite John Millais (definitely a story for another time)- began to show an interest in Rossetti’s work and, by default, in Lizzie’s. He liked her drawings so much that he offered her £150 per annum for all the works she produced, and masterminded the sales of several of her paintings. While Rossetti, her teacher, continued to struggle with his art, Lizzie flourished. Under funding and suggestion from Ruskin, she travelled to Oxford for her health and visited Paris. Lizzie as the artist began to outshine Rossetti, although it is impossible to tell whether he harboured any resentment. It appears that he supported her pursuits whole-heartedly, yet we also know that simultaneously he carried on affairs with Annie Miller and Fanny Cornforth. The dynamic between Lizzie and Rossetti at this time is enigmatic at best.
Few of Lizzie’s pictures survive, only those that were sold. After her death, Rossetti burned her drawings and letters because he could not bear to see them.
Zoom Info
wonderland-to-westeros:

It is not precisely known when Elizabeth Siddal bridged the gap from muse to artist, nor is it known whether the desire to be an artist emerged during her time as a model or was a long-harboured dream brought to life by newfound circumstances. Whatever the case, we know that by 1853 Dante Gabriel Rossetti was teaching Lizzie to be an artist.
In 1854, John Ruskin- icon and patron of artists, including Pre-Raphaelite John Millais (definitely a story for another time)- began to show an interest in Rossetti’s work and, by default, in Lizzie’s. He liked her drawings so much that he offered her £150 per annum for all the works she produced, and masterminded the sales of several of her paintings. While Rossetti, her teacher, continued to struggle with his art, Lizzie flourished. Under funding and suggestion from Ruskin, she travelled to Oxford for her health and visited Paris. Lizzie as the artist began to outshine Rossetti, although it is impossible to tell whether he harboured any resentment. It appears that he supported her pursuits whole-heartedly, yet we also know that simultaneously he carried on affairs with Annie Miller and Fanny Cornforth. The dynamic between Lizzie and Rossetti at this time is enigmatic at best.
Few of Lizzie’s pictures survive, only those that were sold. After her death, Rossetti burned her drawings and letters because he could not bear to see them.
Zoom Info
wonderland-to-westeros:

It is not precisely known when Elizabeth Siddal bridged the gap from muse to artist, nor is it known whether the desire to be an artist emerged during her time as a model or was a long-harboured dream brought to life by newfound circumstances. Whatever the case, we know that by 1853 Dante Gabriel Rossetti was teaching Lizzie to be an artist.
In 1854, John Ruskin- icon and patron of artists, including Pre-Raphaelite John Millais (definitely a story for another time)- began to show an interest in Rossetti’s work and, by default, in Lizzie’s. He liked her drawings so much that he offered her £150 per annum for all the works she produced, and masterminded the sales of several of her paintings. While Rossetti, her teacher, continued to struggle with his art, Lizzie flourished. Under funding and suggestion from Ruskin, she travelled to Oxford for her health and visited Paris. Lizzie as the artist began to outshine Rossetti, although it is impossible to tell whether he harboured any resentment. It appears that he supported her pursuits whole-heartedly, yet we also know that simultaneously he carried on affairs with Annie Miller and Fanny Cornforth. The dynamic between Lizzie and Rossetti at this time is enigmatic at best.
Few of Lizzie’s pictures survive, only those that were sold. After her death, Rossetti burned her drawings and letters because he could not bear to see them.
Zoom Info
wonderland-to-westeros:

It is not precisely known when Elizabeth Siddal bridged the gap from muse to artist, nor is it known whether the desire to be an artist emerged during her time as a model or was a long-harboured dream brought to life by newfound circumstances. Whatever the case, we know that by 1853 Dante Gabriel Rossetti was teaching Lizzie to be an artist.
In 1854, John Ruskin- icon and patron of artists, including Pre-Raphaelite John Millais (definitely a story for another time)- began to show an interest in Rossetti’s work and, by default, in Lizzie’s. He liked her drawings so much that he offered her £150 per annum for all the works she produced, and masterminded the sales of several of her paintings. While Rossetti, her teacher, continued to struggle with his art, Lizzie flourished. Under funding and suggestion from Ruskin, she travelled to Oxford for her health and visited Paris. Lizzie as the artist began to outshine Rossetti, although it is impossible to tell whether he harboured any resentment. It appears that he supported her pursuits whole-heartedly, yet we also know that simultaneously he carried on affairs with Annie Miller and Fanny Cornforth. The dynamic between Lizzie and Rossetti at this time is enigmatic at best.
Few of Lizzie’s pictures survive, only those that were sold. After her death, Rossetti burned her drawings and letters because he could not bear to see them.
Zoom Info
wonderland-to-westeros:

It is not precisely known when Elizabeth Siddal bridged the gap from muse to artist, nor is it known whether the desire to be an artist emerged during her time as a model or was a long-harboured dream brought to life by newfound circumstances. Whatever the case, we know that by 1853 Dante Gabriel Rossetti was teaching Lizzie to be an artist.
In 1854, John Ruskin- icon and patron of artists, including Pre-Raphaelite John Millais (definitely a story for another time)- began to show an interest in Rossetti’s work and, by default, in Lizzie’s. He liked her drawings so much that he offered her £150 per annum for all the works she produced, and masterminded the sales of several of her paintings. While Rossetti, her teacher, continued to struggle with his art, Lizzie flourished. Under funding and suggestion from Ruskin, she travelled to Oxford for her health and visited Paris. Lizzie as the artist began to outshine Rossetti, although it is impossible to tell whether he harboured any resentment. It appears that he supported her pursuits whole-heartedly, yet we also know that simultaneously he carried on affairs with Annie Miller and Fanny Cornforth. The dynamic between Lizzie and Rossetti at this time is enigmatic at best.
Few of Lizzie’s pictures survive, only those that were sold. After her death, Rossetti burned her drawings and letters because he could not bear to see them.
Zoom Info

wonderland-to-westeros:

It is not precisely known when Elizabeth Siddal bridged the gap from muse to artist, nor is it known whether the desire to be an artist emerged during her time as a model or was a long-harboured dream brought to life by newfound circumstances. Whatever the case, we know that by 1853 Dante Gabriel Rossetti was teaching Lizzie to be an artist.

In 1854, John Ruskin- icon and patron of artists, including Pre-Raphaelite John Millais (definitely a story for another time)- began to show an interest in Rossetti’s work and, by default, in Lizzie’s. He liked her drawings so much that he offered her £150 per annum for all the works she produced, and masterminded the sales of several of her paintings. While Rossetti, her teacher, continued to struggle with his art, Lizzie flourished. Under funding and suggestion from Ruskin, she travelled to Oxford for her health and visited Paris. Lizzie as the artist began to outshine Rossetti, although it is impossible to tell whether he harboured any resentment. It appears that he supported her pursuits whole-heartedly, yet we also know that simultaneously he carried on affairs with Annie Miller and Fanny Cornforth. The dynamic between Lizzie and Rossetti at this time is enigmatic at best.

Few of Lizzie’s pictures survive, only those that were sold. After her death, Rossetti burned her drawings and letters because he could not bear to see them.